Dealing With PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder): The Mechanism of Trauma and PTSD



When addressing trauma/ PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) one must be aware that dissociation is a safety mechanism, a way of dealing with the overwhelming experience of a traumatic event or period in life.

If a practitioner ignores this survival mechanism and pushes for release, he’s potentially making the symptomatic conditions of PTSD worse rather than better.

By all means I am a supporter of PTSD and any form of Post-Traumatic Stress to be recognized juridically, professionally and by insurance companies, especially for vocations at high risk like the military, health, search and rescue emergency services and the police.

Recognition and treatment of Trauma or PTSD at an early stage greatly reduces suffering on all levels: personally and for society at large.

What I have seen, although sadly too often, is that those suffering from the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress are fighting to get official recognition of their condition. I know that there is justification for putting up a fight, but this just isn’t the right time.

On a physiological level trauma is high energy arousal of the nervous system that hasn’t had the possibility to discharge. It thereby interferes with the normal functioning of the nervous system and is most often accompanied by physical symptoms and mental-emotional disturbances.

The impact that leads to high energy arousal in the nervous system can either be incidental, like surgery or a car accident, or develop over time, for example feelings of incompetence, lack of self-worth etc.

The body is wired to self-regulate back to health. When we are over- whelmed by threat without having the possibility to regulate the high energy arousal of the nervous system through fight or flight, the body freezes the energy as an ultimate survival strategy. When there is no further interference the body/nervous system will release this energy when space, time and allowance for it are given and available.

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Get Roland’s eBook – PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE: DEVELOPMENTAL CHILDHOOD TRAUMA:

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
Childhood Trauma Triumphs over All of Them
Developmental Attachment Trauma
Can you Recover from and be Fully Healed of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)
Developmental Trauma
Transcript of Working with Sexual Abuse
Attachment Bonds, Suppressed Anger and Anxiety Disorder
The Identity of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)
Child Abuse and Reenactment
Love and Sex: Going down the wrong Rabbit hole
My Relationship to Anger
Are You really going to Save the World?
The Habit of Illness

Why We Need to Address Trauma

Trauma is pervasive in our current society. It is also severely stigmatized and marginalized; as if we don’t want to look at it and be confronted with it. It is the silent epidemic running havoc in our lives and affecting our health on all levels; mentally, emotionally and physically.

We seem to want to recognize trauma, and only to some degree, for those who have gone to war or are in high-risk professions but the bulk of occurring trauma happens much closer to us. What runs rampant and are much more common traumas are:

CHILDHOOD TRAUMA, ABUSE AND NEGLECT (not being wanted, incessant comparing, verbal psychological abuse and bullying, divorcing parents, growing up with alcoholic or depressed parents)
SEXUAL ABUSE
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ABUSE (both in childhood and adulthood)
LOSS AND ABANDONMENT(death of son, daughter, brother, sister, dad or mom)
POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS AFTER SURGERY OR LIFE-THREATENING DISEASE
POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS AFTER ACCIDENTS (especially car-accidents)


Source: Youtube